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Posted By RocketScott Monday, March 01, 2021 9:21 AM
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71KW
 Posted Sunday, March 28, 2021 5:20 AM
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Being from Canada, I ran into this problem when I went to the conventions. I don't remember exactly who I talked to. Probably phoned the scales. What I was told is as long as you are not running as a commercial venture, and cover or remove any company names, you are fine. Some people write "private vehicle not for hire" on the side. Private vehicle plates helps. Didn't even have to go over scales or use log books, which I did anyways, just to be on the safe side. Hope this helps. I know this doesn't apply to you, but at the Canada/US border I was told to go through the regular passenger side, not the commercial side. All went well. No problems. Hope this helps.
RocketScott
 Posted Thursday, March 04, 2021 5:27 AM
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Last Active: Friday, April 30, 2021 4:26 PM
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I emailed the Oregon DOT on Monday but haven't heard back yet

All the info I'm finding on their site muddles the distinction area between commercial and noncommercial for the weight-mile tax

ODOTs website says this:

"The Weight-mile tax applies to vehicles in commercial operations on public roads within Oregon with a registered weight over 26,000 pounds."
Brocky
 Posted Thursday, March 04, 2021 2:38 AM
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I believe that in most states you can get a temporary one way / one trip permits. The company I worked for used to do this when we had to go into an out of normal operation state which were we NOT apportioned or IFTAed for. Do you know someone who is at the managerial level of a trucking company who might be able to help you secure these permits??

Brocky

Diamond T and Brockway Collector
Geoff Weeks
 Posted Wednesday, March 03, 2021 2:15 AM
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Last Active: Friday, May 14, 2021 1:53 AM
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Your getting into a real gray area that is a can of worms.
Normally the tractor plate is based on the weight it is expected to carry, collector plates and the like are empty weight so much less.
Fuel for all vehicles is taxed where sold, not a problem for car that can only travel 300-400 without buying fuel. Trucks need a fuel permit for each state or IFTA to pay the fuel tax based on the mileage run in that state.
Enforcement personnel are not likely going to let you slide on those taxes even if not for hire, moving your own stuff.
What is permitted under law and what the cop knows while he has you on the side of the hiway are often two very different things. You MAY (or may not) win in court but that doesn't get you moving again from the traffic stop.
Empty trucks going to a national show may fall under an exemption, loaded truck not going to a show isn't likely to.
To be safe, call each of the states in question to see what they require, get the name or badge number of who you talked to and carry that with you along with what they told you will need.
Good luck!
RocketScott
 Posted Monday, March 01, 2021 9:21 AM
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Last Active: Friday, April 30, 2021 4:26 PM
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I'm planning on moving from Tacoma, WA to Lexington, KY next month and am planning out my route. I have an '89 Pete 379 with an '84 Fruehauf that has a collector plate and combination plate respectively

Reading through the laws of various states it looks Oregon is going to be a hassle. I see that there was talk a few years ago about getting exemption letters for going to a show there. Have the laws changed at all since then or do I need to get a weight per mile exemption letter?

Legally it might be easier to go over to Idaho and down but Oregon would be faster and have better road conditions

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