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Bendix Tu Flo 500

Posted By stkcode Friday, April 22, 2011 10:16 AM
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stkcode
 Posted Friday, April 22, 2011 10:16 AM
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So as fixing all the air leaks on the 930, I decided to also check the air discharge port on the compressor for deposits, since the air cleaner looks like it hasn't been changed since the stone age (yea, it was that bad).

I was surprised to find around 1/4" of build up, which what I thought was carbon build up.  Plugged the inside of the port and let it soak in oven cleaner for 24 hours.  Nothing...stuff is like a rock.  Next, let it soak in Seafoam for a day and a half.  Nah-dah.  The stuff is still there and like a rock.

So, I introduced the build up to Mr. Dremel with a small grinding wheel.  Oh, that worked great minus after a grind on one spot, there is shinny metal underneath.  What????

So I smooth out some more of the surface...and more shiny metal.  This doesn't seem right.  I check my service manual for the Bendix and according to the diagram, the discharge hole should just be a clean hole into the head.

Does anyone by a chance have a picture of the head discharge port?

It looks like this was a bad casting or something when the head was made.  I find it hard to believe the factory would have made the head with what looks like hot metal that ran into the port and cooled.  It's uneven...meaning the left side if higher then the right...with the center being the lowest.  It's rough in texture...not as in metal rusting away, but like liquid metal that ran and cooled.
It's also higher further in the port and gets lower or less as it gets to the outside of the compressor port.  This is definitely reducing the size of the discharge port in the head.

I'm really confused here...I went ahead and took the Dremel and smoothed out the bumpy rough stuff the best I could.  Figured it couldn't hurt to do so but any thoughts on this.  It's damn strange.

Thanks.


--
Jon

1953 GMC 930 Conventional
Tony Bullard
 Posted Saturday, April 23, 2011 2:56 AM
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stkcode (4/22/2011)
So as fixing all the air leaks on the 930, I decided to also check the air discharge port on the compressor for deposits, since the air cleaner looks like it hasn't been changed since the stone age (yea, it was that bad).


It's also higher further in the port and gets lower or less as it gets to the outside of the compressor port.  This is definitely reducing the size of the discharge port in the head.

I'm really confused here...I went ahead and took the Dremel and smoothed out the bumpy rough stuff the best I could.  Figured it couldn't hurt to do so but any thoughts on this.  It's damn strange.

Thanks.


"This is definitely reducing the size of the discharge port in the head."

Get a rough calculation of the discharge area and I'll bet its still bigger than the .306 square inches area of the 5/8"(?) discharge tube. 


Tony Bullard, Chelsea Vermont
''''''''34 Ford BB restored,
''''''''62 Autocar DC870H restored
junkmandan
 Posted Saturday, April 23, 2011 4:56 AM
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Sounds like a gyppo aftermarket casting made in Hong Kong .
stkcode
 Posted Saturday, April 23, 2011 2:04 PM
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Just a follow up on this...it is the casting.  I'm going to see if I can get a part number off the head and check with Bendix.  I'm guessing Dan's right and it's some kind of aftermarket head.

--
Jon

1953 GMC 930 Conventional
John_Costley
 Posted Saturday, April 23, 2011 8:07 PM
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Jon,

Any air system info you need, including info on that compressor, should be here  http://www.bendix.com/en/servicessupport/documentlibrary/doclib_1.jsp  John

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