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What Am I for Tuesday 3/01/11


http://forums.aths.org/Topic114617.aspx
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By Jeff Lakaszcyck - Monday, February 28, 2011 3:33 PM
How many remember when milk was delivered to your door ? Emblems removed. Photo from Bill White.

By Daryl Gushee - Monday, February 28, 2011 3:42 PM
I'll guess Federal
By peterj - Monday, February 28, 2011 3:48 PM
Looks a little like a Federal.
By Autocarjim - Monday, February 28, 2011 4:05 PM
Federal
By Brocky - Monday, February 28, 2011 4:28 PM
OK I will go for Federal Also

Our local dairy ran F-3 Fords until mid 50's then replaced a few with Divco's but then were bought out in early 60's
By clyde318 - Monday, February 28, 2011 5:04 PM
I believe Federal as well.
By Don MacKenzie - Monday, February 28, 2011 5:25 PM
Keep the ball rolling.  FEDERAL.
By Bruce Ohnstad - Monday, February 28, 2011 5:59 PM
good looking heavy delivery truck

To reply to Jeff's question, milk delivery continued until about the late 1960s in my central Minnesota town.  Delivered in the rural areas, even.  I was just a toddler, I remember the guy delivering milk.  My mother says if we weren't up when he came he'd just come in and put the milk in the fridge, then holler for us to get up.....

Bruce
By tamangel - Monday, February 28, 2011 6:13 PM
a little late but also with the Federal group, 1936 or so..

Mike W
By RobBalfour - Monday, February 28, 2011 7:08 PM
I'll go with the Federal crowd too. We had milk delivery from Hoods until the mid 70's. Our milkman's name was Elmer and he would bring the milk in and put it right on the kitchen table for us.
By Warren Richardson - Tuesday, March 01, 2011 12:36 AM
Stewart
By Davwingman - Tuesday, March 01, 2011 5:39 AM
Agree Stewart about '35- '36
By MikeM - Tuesday, March 01, 2011 11:19 AM
In Saugus, MA (just north of Boston, we had Hood's, and my grandmother had United Farmers, then Whitings.  The milkmen left a big chunk of ice in the insulated box on the porch, and placed the milk on top.

Miss the days of glass bottles, and the cream atop the milk.
By clyde318 - Tuesday, March 01, 2011 3:06 PM
We had two different companies around the neighborhood when I was a kid,one was a small outfit from Stockbridge Mich that was called Hickory Ridge Farm Dairy. Had all white Divcos. Thought it was weird that the milkman stood to drive. The other was Twin Pines Dairy out of Detroit. Their trucks were mostly Divcos,but for the routes in outlying areas,they did have some Dodges. Their livery was a beige with green trim and lettering.
By Jeff Lakaszcyck - Tuesday, March 01, 2011 3:10 PM
Although it may sometimes seem that I have all the answers, today is a case in point that I really don't ! I had myself convinced this truck was an Indiana, and went to bed last night smug in the fact that I had fooled everyone so far. But when I saw all the Federal answers earlier today I figured I better double check, and now I have lots of egg on my face. Daryl Gushee and everyone else who agreed with him are correct, this old milk truck is a 1936 Federal. Just to show the similarity, I found a pic of a Indiana milk truck, a 1937 model. Thanks to Bill White for the Federal photo.

Lots of memories here about the milkman. Growing up in Haverhill Massachusetts our longtime milkman was Mike Drelick, an independent dairy man from Epping, New Hampshire. Mike would come 2 or 3 times a week, and would leave the milk bottles on the porch. It was the unhomogenized milk with the layer of cream on top. Saturday was payday, and Mike would let himself in to collect the money waiting for him on the table. Sometimes my dad would forget to leave it, and Mike wasn't shy about hollering until someone woke up and came out to pay him ! Mike delivered milk to us through the late '60's when he had a heart attack and passed away. All Mike's were fords, either pickups or conventional step vans.



By peterj - Tuesday, March 01, 2011 3:16 PM
Jeff, There was a F on the hubcap!
By Jeff Lakaszcyck - Tuesday, March 01, 2011 3:20 PM
Peter, I saw something on the hubcab, it didn't register as an F, and didn't look like an "I", so I left it ! Doh !
By peterj - Tuesday, March 01, 2011 3:23 PM
You have to turn the wheel... lol
By Bob McDaniel (Indiana Trucks) - Tuesday, March 01, 2011 3:39 PM
First thing that came to my mind was Indiana too but something just didn't look right. It was to new for me anyway and White would have made it if it were an Indiana.  
By Warren Richardson - Tuesday, March 01, 2011 4:02 PM
Here is a similar Stewart
By Jeff Lakaszcyck - Tuesday, March 01, 2011 4:51 PM
All 3 were pretty similar, weren't they ?
By Bruce Ohnstad - Tuesday, March 01, 2011 5:48 PM
You'll be pitching strikes again soon, Jeff,

Bruce
By Davwingman - Wednesday, March 02, 2011 2:38 AM
http://auto.howstuffworks.com/1935-1936-stewart-panel-and-dump-truck.htm

1936 Stewart one-ton panel truck
By Warren Richardson - Thursday, March 03, 2011 12:36 AM
It looks like Federal, Stewart and Indiana all used at least some of the same sheet metal.  I couldn't find evidence that Stewart ever used 3 horizontal bars on the hood though whereas both Stewart and Indiana did.  Frankly I thought that the truck was a Federal, but since Stewart was so similar I figured I'd toss it in.  I'd feel pretty foolish if it turned out to be a Stewart and I didn't speak up! It would be interesting to know how these 3 companies came to use such a similar set-up.
By Bruce Ohnstad - Thursday, March 03, 2011 11:46 AM
These manufacturers in the Lake Erie region, Detroit, Buffalo, Indiana/Ohio may have been using the same vendor.  Kind of like Budd supplying several makes of cabs, and the other big body builders (that supplied Ford, I can't remember them right now)  Metropolitan Body supplied both White and Sterling cabs (at certain times) and later went on to build for IH. 

So it would be interesting to find the body builders for these brands.

Bruce
By Bruce Ohnstad - Thursday, March 03, 2011 11:47 AM
These manufacturers in the Lake Erie region, Detroit, Buffalo, Indiana/Ohio may have been using the same vendor.  Kind of like Budd supplying several makes of cabs, and the other big body builders (that supplied Ford, I can't remember them right now)  Metropolitan Body supplied both White and Sterling cabs (at certain times) and later went on to build for IH. 

So it would be interesting to find the body builders for these brands.

Bruce
By Daryl Gushee - Thursday, March 03, 2011 12:22 PM
RobBalfour (3/1/2011)
I'll go with the Federal crowd too. We had milk delivery from Hoods until the mid 70's. Our milkman's name was Elmer and he would bring the milk in and put it right on the kitchen table for us.


  It seems Rob and I had the same milkman in the mid seventies. That would mean they covered a pretty big area, if Rob lived near his current location. At the time I lived in Gorham.
   Rob, didn't Hood also have a cow in their advertisements named Elmer around that time? Seems like I remember that being funny the milkman also had the same name.
By peterj - Thursday, March 03, 2011 12:41 PM
Elmer was the glue , Elouise was the cow. Didn't she belong to Kraft?
By Wolfcreek_Steve - Thursday, March 03, 2011 4:53 PM
Elmer was the bull (glue), Elsie was the cow (milk), both belonged to Borden. If there was an Elouise, I never met her. That's my story and I'm stickin' to it.
By peterj - Thursday, March 03, 2011 5:10 PM
Steve,  your right, i'm claiming CRS....  lol
By Bob McDaniel (Indiana Trucks) - Friday, March 04, 2011 3:31 PM
By the time the milk trucks looked like this, White was building them and put Indiana name tags on them.
By Daryl Gushee - Friday, March 04, 2011 5:09 PM
Wolfcreek_Steve (3/3/2011)
Elmer was the bull (glue), Elsie was the cow (milk), both belonged to Borden. If there was an Elouise, I never met her. That's my story and I'm stickin' to it.


I think your right Steve.
That must be where I got the Elmer the milkman and cow relation going in my head.
We also had a local dairy, Locust Farm, that had "Penelope the purple cow" on their slogan. I never understood why she was purple, but it was the sixties and early seventies.
By Wolfcreek_Steve - Friday, March 04, 2011 6:58 PM
Daryl Gushee (3/4/2011)

I think your right Steve.
That must be where I got the Elmer the milkman and cow relation going in my head.
We also had a local dairy, Locust Farm, that had "Penelope the purple cow" on their slogan. I never understood why she was purple, but it was the sixties and early seventies.


Reminds me of a little rhyme my dad used to say,
I've never seen a purple cow
I never hope to see one
but would rather see than be one