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Leyland Canada - What Model Leyland Were They Based On?

Posted By Tatra Sunday, October 24, 2010 3:42 AM
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Swishy
 Posted Friday, December 18, 2020 4:43 PM
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gr8 pic MG
keep m cummin

only leyland we had lookd like this

http://beamish.beamish.biz/pictures/d/d138-S.jpg

may B Leyland Hippo?

cya

 

"Jist doing wot cums naturally" Sum may say "The early bird gets the worm!"

But we all know the 2nd mouse gets the cheese

Ifn U're truck comes with two sticks, U might as well just row a boat

 

Friday, December 18, 2020 4:46 PM by Swishy
montreal guy
 Posted Friday, December 18, 2020 3:03 PM
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Hi everyone,

I was looking through my dad's pictures from the early 50's. He had bought 3 Leylands (trucks were hard to come about after the war). Leylands were now made in Montreal, and available. Also, being Canadian, it was thought to be a good idea to encourage British products, especially those made locally.
These were beautiful trucks. I still remember seeing the bison insignia on the side of the hood.

I was young (6-7 years old kid at the time), and kept on asking questions. the answers I got were.
-good economical engines.
-injection pumps were run by a shaft going from front of engine to rear (or maybe middle). To assure the shaft would not bind, a universal joint made of several thin washers was used. This joint could fail at any time as the flexing of these washers would cause them to crack, and your truck would be out of service.
-no power steering, and lugged tires, therefore trucks were running over curbs all the time.
-foot steps on both sides were too low, and had to be partially cut. (a dump truck is continually off the road).
-the worm gear rear differential were very hard on tires (at did not help steering), and wore out the tires very fast.

Unfortunately, a few years later, he parked the 3 leylands in a field, and never touched them again. Too much maintenance required. He bought a few Mack trucks, and surprisingly a series of gas engined GMC's, Internationals, etc. which required quite a bit less maintenance.

To sum it all up, my dad's reflexion on the leylands was *they were designed by kids*.

Too bad, however, this might explain the disappearance of British trucks in a market where there are altenatives.
 96.jpg (52 views, 1.71 MB)
 97.jpg (47 views, 1.57 MB)
Friday, December 18, 2020 3:09 PM by montreal guy
fageol100
 Posted Monday, January 13, 2014 8:46 PM
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BobtheRock-thanks for posting that Can Car brochure-it's great. That photo of the two Briggs cabbed Leylands is fantastic-I especially like the Leyland cum White.

Interesting that the Canada truck used Spicer and Fuller gearboxes and Eaton axles, I haven't seen any spec sheets or brochures for the earlier Canadian Leylands-but I would imagine they used Leyland gearboxes, front axles and worm drive rear axles. Re: the Briggs cabbed Canadian Leylands, I think the Beaver was a 4x2, the Bull Moose was a 6x2 and the Bison was a 6x4.
John Frances
 Posted Thursday, December 19, 2013 10:10 AM
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Thanks for posting, that's a great brochure.
Bobtherock
 Posted Thursday, December 19, 2013 6:57 AM
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My dad was working at the Longueil plan of Leyland Motor in the 50’s. He was making the different body parts for the engine compartment. On his behalf I send a few pictures that may help answering some questions.
 Leyland Book1.pdf (658 views, 142.86 KB)
 Leyland Book2.pdf (605 views, 466.12 KB)
 Leyland First.pdf (601 views, 357.13 KB)
 Leyland Book3.pdf (639 views, 382.90 KB)
 Leyland Book4.pdf (608 views, 335.83 KB)
Tatra
 Posted Monday, October 25, 2010 9:50 AM
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Thanks for the responses so far. Jules, this is a rare brochure. That's a Beaver trying to look like a Diamond T to me! On the other side of the world, they ended up looking like some kind of a... Hayes (if you squint. Pic by Yitzhak Amit) and then developed their own styling (those are Israeli Leyland Ashdod Super Beavers, first and second series). The one I am hunting though was a bigger animal. I have a feeling the Canadian Leyland Bison might have been based on the Buffalo and that's what the Dunklin pic shows...

Cheers,

T


The early worm catches a bird
jelesueur48
 Posted Monday, October 25, 2010 8:33 AM
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Attached is the only spec sheet, plus a dimension sheet, that I have ever found on the "Canada".

Jules

PS That is a Comet cab pictured below, I have overlayed them and they are basically the same.
 cancar canada spec sheet.pdf (537 views, 678.52 KB)
Monday, October 25, 2010 8:39 AM by jelesueur48
pete
 Posted Sunday, October 24, 2010 11:37 AM
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THe early one's were called Leyland Beavers here and the later one's were Canada Diesels assembled by Canadian Car and Foundry(Can Car) and had IH cabs.Hanson Transport from Hamilton ON had them pulling tri axles and steel trains with get this,vacuum brakes probably late 50's .Johnson Brothers a gravel hauler from Milton ON hd a fleet of them I think they bought the last batch of them 30 or 40 I think.After they got rid of them they pretty well dissapeared maybe exported,I only ever saw one for sale used at White Motor Co around 62.

Pete

Too many projects too little time

Bill White
 Posted Sunday, October 24, 2010 9:58 AM
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Hi Tatra, I think it was the Leyland Beaver that was first built in Canada.

Take care,

Bill




athscentraliowa.org
47 Willys CJ2A, 47 Bantam T3C, 47 Diamond T 910, 53 White WC24, 49 IH KBS11
Tatra
 Posted Sunday, October 24, 2010 3:42 AM
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Good Day All,

It's a not well known fact but for some years Leyland trucks were produced in Canada. I think the first ones were based on, and looked like, the conventional English Hippo but the later ones had a modified appearence more in line with what was expected in the N. American market (see below from Hank's):

 

The cab which at first sight looks like something pirated of an LJ Mack is most likely an adaptation of the smaller Leyland Comet's cab but the front is unique. I know the first models used a Leyland 680 (680 ci) engine, which with 150 hp was really not enough for the Canadian and US markets even in the 1950s. Now, Leyland (in England) actually had a bigger model which I believe was developed to compete with the US truck industry's offerings which were starting to take sales away from Leyland in ex-colonies like Australia, NZ, South Africa, (then) Rhodesia and Israel, as well as Spain and S. America. That model was the Buffalo and it used a far bigger engine, the 900, which had 230 hp (or 275 hp when turbocharged for railcar use). This was more like it but - typically for Leyland - they managed to botch it all by not offering the right transmission, building the truck overly heavy and (surprize) generally not listening to their dealers. The Buffalo looked different from the smaller Hippo (see below, courtesy of the Big Lorry Blog):





Looking at the Canadian truck it seems to me that long hood hides something bigger than the 680ci engine...

My question is:

Does anyone know what were the Canadian models' specs? Is it possible that the Canadian Leyland Bison was none other than a Buffalo with a front set front axle? What transmissions did they use?

I know these are obscure questions, but maybe there's a hidden Leyland Canada expert on the forum:)

Cheers,



The early worm catches a bird

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