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1951 "Haul Thrift"... Nash vs. Studebaker?

Posted By chtrout Saturday, December 21, 2019 5:29 AM
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Brocky
 Posted Wednesday, January 01, 2020 2:15 AM
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This is similiar to the Diamond T / International Harvester relationship.. It is known that DT design engineer Ray Carter was a close personal friend with the design engineer at IH. As a result it is not known who actually designed the IH "Compfovision" cab which came out in 1950. It is assumed that it was a combined effort of the 2 men?? Were there friendships among various administrator elements of both Studebaker and Nash??

Brocky

Diamond T and Brockway Collector
Wednesday, January 01, 2020 2:19 AM by Brocky
Wolfcreek_Steve
 Posted Tuesday, December 31, 2019 4:13 PM
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Bruce Ohnstad (12/31/2019)
A collector in Minnesota had both a late 1940s Nash and a Studebaker 1.5 tonners with dump boxes. They had similarities. The trucks are now at the Van der Haag museum in Sanborn, Iowa. Mr. Felix researched some history on Nash, they only made a few trucks in the late 1940s. Nash had tow truck hoists for their own use.

The companies were separate but I wonder if some engineering was purchased?

Bruce

From the late 40s through their end, Studebaker hired Raymond Loewy to do at least some design work on their cars, so I wouldn't be surprised if he did some work on their R series trucks that came out in 49.

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Steve Peterson
Central Wisconsin

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Tuesday, December 31, 2019 4:14 PM by Wolfcreek_Steve
Bruce Ohnstad
 Posted Tuesday, December 31, 2019 4:01 PM
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A collector in Minnesota had both a late 1940s Nash and a Studebaker 1.5 tonners with dump boxes. They had similarities. The trucks are now at the Van der Haag museum in Sanborn, Iowa. Mr. Felix researched some history on Nash, they only made a few trucks in the late 1940s. Nash had tow truck hoists for their own use.

The companies were separate but I wonder if some engineering was purchased?

Bruce

1932 White 643 restored in the working museum
Wolfcreek_Steve
 Posted Sunday, December 22, 2019 4:35 AM
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Craig, Studebaker merged with Packard, then went out of production in '66. Nash merged with Hudson, formed American Motors, which eventually became part of Chrysler, now Fiat-Chrysler.
I don't believe Studebaker and Nash were ever "under the same roof"

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“He, who is without oil, shall throw the first rod” Compressions 8.7:1
Steve Peterson
Central Wisconsin

Follow The Leaders For They Know The Way AUTOCAR
chtrout
 Posted Saturday, December 21, 2019 5:29 AM
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In 1951, Coleman Motors of Littleton, Colorado converted a 3-ton "Haul Thrift" stake-bed truck to 4x4 by doing an in-plant conversion with a Coleman FDA (Front Drive Axle). Although this conversion was frequently referred to as a "Studebaker," the badge on the hood appears to be "Nash." Were Nash and Studebaker made by the same parent company in 1951? I know they were later merged, and perhaps that is the source of confusion. Anybody know for sure?

Craig H. Trout
ATHS Life Member

Researching Holmes / Plains / Coleman / American Coleman Trucks
and selected production partners, such as Columbian Steel Tank, Quick-Way Truck Shovel, Howe-Coleman, International Harvester, Marmon-Herrington, and SnowBlast

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