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Governed vs. Non-Governed Engines

Posted By DieselTruckMan81 Monday, May 09, 2011 3:07 PM
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DieselTruckMan81
 Posted Monday, May 09, 2011 3:07 PM
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Hi,

If I were to operate any truck or bus, I would prefer governed engines over non-governed. What this means is that the engine will always be set to run as it was from the factory (i.e. if a Cummins M11E is geared to run at 2100 rpm, where its 280 hp is developed at, then I will not let it run faster than that, the governor will be set at factory limits, none higher).

A non-governed engine, or one governed beyond factory specifications, means increased risk of engine damage.

So, my fellow diesel engine fanatics, do you prefer governed or non-governed engines?

~Ben

I am a big fan of old diesel trucks, especially those with Detroit Diesel and classic Cummins engines (743/855 cu. in.)
Geoff Weeks
 Posted Monday, May 09, 2011 3:47 PM
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I can't think of one diesel that isn't governed... Some have a speed limiting gov (max and min speed only), some have a variable speed gov that is gov thoughout the whole range, the pedel sets the speed up to max speed (Cat is like this)
junkmandan
 Posted Monday, May 09, 2011 4:04 PM
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Ben-------I can see you're starting your meaningless polls on this forum now ,after getting bored on the Detroit forum on Yahoo .
Bill White
 Posted Monday, May 09, 2011 4:16 PM
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I also would not mess with governed engines over factory settings


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Wolfcreek_Steve
 Posted Monday, May 09, 2011 5:58 PM
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DieselTruckMan81 (5/9/2011)

A non-governed engine, or one governed beyond factory specifications, means increased risk of engine damage.

~Ben


Ben, could you name a non-governed diesel engine, so I can better understand your question?

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Aaron
 Posted Monday, May 09, 2011 5:59 PM
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I roll the govs outa the way and run em.

 And Dan is right


I can't get anymore out of it, I've got both sticks hot clear up to the knobs allready.
www.killcarb.org
John_Costley
 Posted Monday, May 09, 2011 11:17 PM
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Ben,

We always set Cummins and Detroits to 2,450, set Cats to 2,350.Never seemed to wear out any quicker, but we didnt cruise them at that RPM, just set them so when you shifted a gear fully loaded on an upgrade at max rpms you could shift a tad slower and still have a decent rpm left when you got into the next gear.The only reason I would hold one down is if I had more than one and didnt trust the hired driver to Not cruise at 2,450,lol.John
DieselTruckMan81
 Posted Friday, May 13, 2011 5:49 PM
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Wolfcreek_Steve (5/9/2011)

Ben, could you name a non-governed diesel engine, so I can better understand your question?

A few OTTOMH (off the top of my head) include certain IH gasoline engines used in some of their medium trucks and school buses (V-345, V-392, MV-404, MV-446). Not diesels though, but still...

http://cgi.ebay.com/1976-International-1703-School-Bus-Sales-Brochure-/320108275623?pt=LH_DefaultDomain_0&hash=item4a87f0a7a7#ht_3024wt_1139
Looking at the specifications, you will see one of them says "ENGINE: V-345 gasoline V-8 non-governed, 157 hp."

~Ben

I am a big fan of old diesel trucks, especially those with Detroit Diesel and classic Cummins engines (743/855 cu. in.)
Friday, May 13, 2011 5:52 PM by DieselTruckMan81
Geoff Weeks
 Posted Saturday, May 14, 2011 2:33 AM
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Ben, You started out asking about diesels then bring up gas....

  I worked on a IHC School bus and it definatly had a 392 with a govenor! IIRC all IHC's ORIGNALLY fitted to the larger chassies had governors, not to say someone didn't remove them at some point or replace them with non-governed engines from lighter trucks.

 I have a 282 with a Holley 1bbl that was governed.

  I stand by the statemnet that all diesels are governed.

The 345 in question was likly the lightest Loadstar chassie, I know some of them didn't have a gov, but the heavyer loadstars did, like the 392 I mentioned.
Saturday, May 14, 2011 2:37 AM by Geoff Weeks
garymac
 Posted Saturday, May 14, 2011 5:09 PM
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Hello Ben

Yes all diesel engines require a governor of some sort.

Some governors are full range as mentioned previously, ie idle to full speed

and others were min - max governors only controlling idle and high idle with

the pedal position controlling in between as was the early CAT 1100 series

and this was to give the engine the feel and drivablity similar to a petrol

engine powered truck which these engines (1100s) were initially marketed for.

Early Cummins engine fuel systems PTG were i think min/max governed as if

u were to drive a blower or something of the PTO you would have to get the

governor fitted with a attachment to give better control of the engine speed

during PTO operation.

We were told (hammered in to our heads) during our apprenticeships that to

run a diesel engine without a proper operating governor would result in

major damage to the engine and possibly personal in the area , indeed I saw

the results of several overspeeds and in most cases it resulted in scrap metal.

Best regards   Gary

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