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International Cabovers

Posted By TedWilliams Thursday, February 03, 2011 8:17 AM
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dirtywhiteboy
 Posted Saturday, October 29, 2011 8:53 PM
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heres 2 cabover IH's i seen today in wilco at haw river nc...







the only deference in the men an the boys is the price of there toys...
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dieselcollecta
 Posted Saturday, October 29, 2011 10:47 AM
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Anyway here's some Australian Inter cabovers from NZ to peep at;

Marlena (AKA Marly) from the Waikato in New Zealand.

1975 Inter Paystar 5070 (with 1982 8V-71T)
1978 12V-71 engine
1996 Inter Acco 2350G (with Cummins 6BTA-275)
2003 Inter 7600 chassis

Also restoring at my work
1980 White Road Boss (with 3406B)
1983 White Road Commander (with NTC-350)
 23171906_full.jpg (1,457 views, 33.60 KB)
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dieselcollecta
 Posted Saturday, October 29, 2011 9:57 AM
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Eddy Lucast (10/28/2011)
Thanks Murry, I suspected it would have better steering traction on slick roads but hadn't thought about the loss of traction from more weight being on non-powered axles. Makes sense to me.


Yeah Eddy from my experience truck & trailer combinations just feel safer, but as I said below it depends very much on loading.


Marlena (AKA Marly) from the Waikato in New Zealand.

1975 Inter Paystar 5070 (with 1982 8V-71T)
1978 12V-71 engine
1996 Inter Acco 2350G (with Cummins 6BTA-275)
2003 Inter 7600 chassis

Also restoring at my work
1980 White Road Boss (with 3406B)
1983 White Road Commander (with NTC-350)
dieselcollecta
 Posted Saturday, October 29, 2011 9:36 AM
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RuralRoute (10/28/2011)
Thanks also for your observations on B train vs. truck and dog trailer stability. Legend for years has been that truck and trailer combinations are more stable than tractor trailer combinations, but some of the simulations being done by the road transport research experts in Oz and NJ suggests that tractor trailer combinations are more stable. But the researchers are looking at dry road stability while we truckers are more concerned with stability on icy roads.


The main thing about it all is that there's an indefinite range of loading combinations. We all try to put some good weight over our drivers then spread the rest of the load over the rest of the unit/s. Every similar combination on the road is likely to be loaded differently so the results will vary. In NZ some years ago the authorities developed a braking code for 44 tonne operation, which ensured equal & controlled braking on a complete truck & trailer or B-train unit. It worked well when you were loaded appropriately but if you unloaded your trailer somewhere then carried on somewhere else to unload your truck, watch out!!! Your trailer was being braked as if it was loaded, so much blue smoke, flat spotted tyres & trailer coming around you under braking at intersections/corners/downhills. It was safer to disconnect the trailer hoses & push the yard release button in. Load sensed braking &/or ABS is now required in our new brake rule which has cured this issue, however all those earlier combinations are still legal & still out there!


Marlena (AKA Marly) from the Waikato in New Zealand.

1975 Inter Paystar 5070 (with 1982 8V-71T)
1978 12V-71 engine
1996 Inter Acco 2350G (with Cummins 6BTA-275)
2003 Inter 7600 chassis

Also restoring at my work
1980 White Road Boss (with 3406B)
1983 White Road Commander (with NTC-350)
newfie-trucker
 Posted Friday, October 28, 2011 10:56 AM
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here in Newfoundland Canada from experience trains are a royal pain in winter as traction and pulling on a slippery hills they have a lot of spinning out on themor sliding down on them also so you have to be on your toes
RuralRoute
 Posted Friday, October 28, 2011 10:44 AM
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Thanks also for your observations on B train vs. truck and dog trailer stability. Legend for years has been that truck and trailer combinations are more stable than tractor trailer combinations, but some of the simulations being done by the road transport research experts in Oz and NJ suggests that tractor trailer combinations are more stable. But the researchers are looking at dry road stability while we truckers are more concerned with stability on icy roads.
Eddy Lucast
 Posted Friday, October 28, 2011 9:17 AM
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Thanks Murry, I suspected it would have better steering traction on slick roads but hadn't thought about the loss of traction from more weight being on non-powered axles. Makes sense to me.



Eddy Lucast

http://kbs.justoldtrucks.com


man with wooden truck should be wary of "truck whisperer" with torch
dieselcollecta
 Posted Friday, October 28, 2011 7:34 AM
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Eddy Lucast (10/28/2011)
I'd like to know what effect the second steering axle has on ice & snow???


Eddy I wouldn't say that the 2nd steerer alone would make much difference in icy conditions, although in theory it should have better steering traction with the 2 axles carrying similar weight, maybe? From my own experience with driving both in these conditions I believe the 4 axle truck with 4 axle trailer set-up is more stable than a tractor unit with B-train. However having said that, ice is ice & most of us know what happens when you hit that without exercising adequite caution! 8x4 trucks are common here mainly due to extra load carrying capability, they do have a disadvantage of getting stuck easier in off-the-seal conditions though so definitely a 'stay-on-the-road' type truck.


Marlena (AKA Marly) from the Waikato in New Zealand.

1975 Inter Paystar 5070 (with 1982 8V-71T)
1978 12V-71 engine
1996 Inter Acco 2350G (with Cummins 6BTA-275)
2003 Inter 7600 chassis

Also restoring at my work
1980 White Road Boss (with 3406B)
1983 White Road Commander (with NTC-350)
Eddy Lucast
 Posted Friday, October 28, 2011 2:44 AM
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I'd like to know what effect the second steering axle has on ice & snow???



Eddy Lucast

http://kbs.justoldtrucks.com


man with wooden truck should be wary of "truck whisperer" with torch
dieselcollecta
 Posted Thursday, October 27, 2011 9:48 PM
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Last Active: Wednesday, October 22, 2014 7:58 PM
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Here's some 9800s from down under;

Marlena (AKA Marly) from the Waikato in New Zealand.

1975 Inter Paystar 5070 (with 1982 8V-71T)
1978 12V-71 engine
1996 Inter Acco 2350G (with Cummins 6BTA-275)
2003 Inter 7600 chassis

Also restoring at my work
1980 White Road Boss (with 3406B)
1983 White Road Commander (with NTC-350)
 22505807_full.jpg (1,255 views, 48.13 KB)
 3618182.jpg (1,105 views, 92.39 KB)
 intermidroof-left-big.jpg (1,135 views, 121.75 KB)
 1994736-big.jpg (1,148 views, 64.50 KB)
 15021613-big.jpg (1,141 views, 67.90 KB)
 22821977.jpg (1,159 views, 71.86 KB)

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